Long Hair or Uncut Hair

From BelieveTheSign
William, Billy Paul, Rebekah (with cut hair) and Meda Branham in the 1950s.
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This article is one in a series of studies on William Branham and legalism - you are currently on the page that is in bold:

Women that follow William Branham's message are not permitted to cut their hair. This is one of the primary legalistic tenets of William Branham's followers. In fact, the easiest way to identify women that are followers of William Branham is the length of their hair and their mode of dress.

What William Branham taught

William and Meda Braham with their daughters, with their skirts above their knees and hair to their shoulders.

William Branham said:

  1. Thus saith the Lord, if a married woman cuts her hair, her husband has a right to divorce her.
  2. It is a sin for a woman to cut her hair.
  3. God doesn't hear the prayer of a women that cuts her hair.
  4. Joan of Arc was a spiritual woman who heard the voice of God.

There are a couple of logic problems with the interaction of William Branham's interpretation of the Bible and the plain reading of scripture:

  1. William Branham taught that it was a sin for woman to have her hair cut, as her hair was her covering. 1 Corinthians 11 also says that it is a shame for her to pray in public with her head uncovered. So, logic would tell us that if hair is a covering, and men are shamed for praying with their head covered.... that means, men should all be BALD. (using "message logic").
  2. It also stands to reason that if "long hair" by definition is strictly "UNCUT" hair for women, then "short" hair must mean "cut" hair for men. So a man could have hair halfway down his back, but as long as he trimmed the ends, it's the "short" that Paul had in mind.

As outlined in the discussion below, from a Biblical perspective, while men honor God if they have short hair and likewise women honor God if they have long hair, there is nothing to infer that long hair means "uncut" hair.

Additionally, notwithstanding William Branham's statement that a man is allowed to divorce his wife if she cuts her hair, there is nothing in the Bible to support this outrageous claim. That fact that he stated that this was "thus saith the Lord" would cast doubt on his credibility when he uses this phrase at other times.

What does the Bible actually say?

Message believers in general hold that a woman cannot even trim her hair. But is this what the scriptures teach?

The wording of 1 Corinthians 11

1 Corinthians 11:4-5 states:

Every man who prays or prophesies with his head covered dishonors his head. But every woman who prays or prophesies with her head uncovered dishonors her head...[1]

The New Testament was originally written in Greek, so we need to look at the original text to understand what is being said. Paul states that the man would shame his “head” if he were to have (something) “hanging down the head”; whereas the opposite would prevail for the woman: she would shame her “head” if she were to prophesy “uncovered as to the head.” [2]

The question, of course, is what “having down the head” means, or to put that in another way, “having what down the head”?

Some have argued that this refers to having long hair “down the head,” Because there was disdain for long hair on men was usually in conjunction with homosexuality, where longer hair was artistically decorated to resemble a woman’s. The problem with this, however, is that these passages always refer to hair, and never remotely resemble the language Paul uses here. If Paul had intended long hair, this idiom is a most unusual way of referring to it. On the other hand, although Paul’s idiom is somewhat unusual, it is not without precedent. In Esther 6:12, Haman is said to have “hurried to his house, mourning and with his head covered”. The Septuagint translates this last phrase kata kephalēs (= “down the head”). So also Plutarch speaks of Scipio the Younger as beginning to walk through Alexandria “having the himation down the head,” meaning that he covered his head with part of his toga so as to be unrecognized by the people. Almost certainly, therefore, by this idiom Paul is referring to an external cloth covering.[3]

There three main pillars on which the “no trimming ” doctrine rests, at least as we have been taught it, which are as follows:

1) The word “shorn” means “cut or clip – period”. 2) The early church and true Christians have always taught “no trimming”. 3) Brother Branham believed in “no trimming”.

Meaning of the Word “Shorn” in the Scriptures:

Shorn in the modern English language can mean to “cut or clip”. However, it is usually meant to signify “cutting close” and is usually used in reference to shearing sheep. If you search Brother Branham’s usage of the word, it was used to signify shearing sheep or typing people to being sheared as a sheep.

Shorn in the New Testament was translated from the Greek work Kiero, which means “to sheer: a sheep; to get or let be shorn, of shearing or cutting short the hair of the head”.

The word “shorn” is used 4 times in scripture (there are other instances where another form of the word such as “shear” is used, but these are not listed here). Song of Solomon 4:2 refers to shearing of sheep. It is also used Acts 18:18 referring to Paul having shorn his head because of a vow. Based on Paul’s own teaching, one would conclude that he cut his hair regularly (unless he were to have taken a Nazarite vow). This word “shorn” did not signify simply another trimming or cutting of his hair, but a “cutting close” or “shaving” of his head for sake of the vow. Based on these examples, why would we assume the two times it is used in 1 Corinthians chapter 11 would mean anything different?

Note that Brother Branham also stated that “shorn” means the same thing as “shaven” (QA.HEBREWS.PART.3_ JEFF.IN COD SUNDAY_ 57-1006) which seems consistent with the way it was used in association with a vow in Acts 18:18.

In consideration of the meaning of the word “shorn” let us consider 1 Corinthians 11:6. If the word shorn means “cut hair”, covered means “uncut hair”, and uncovered means “cut hair”, the verse does not read coherently as follows:

“For if the woman [has cut hair], let her also [cut her hair]...

However, if this chapter is speaking of four different lengths, the verse make sense, with covered meaning “long hair”, uncovered meaning “short hair”, shorn meaning “hair cut close to the skin”, and shaven meaning “bald”.

“For if the woman [has short hair], let her also [cut her hair close to the skin]: but if it be a shame for a woman to [have hair cut close to the skin] or [be shaven completely], let her [have long hair]”.

With this, we see the true meaning of the scripture. Paul is saying that if a woman wants to cut her hair short, she might as well shave it.

Practices in the early church

Upon researching early church teachings on this subject, I could find no places where they addressed a “no cutting or trimming” doctrine. In fact, they taught that women were to be veiled with a separate covering other than hair.

I believe 1 Corinthians 11:15 states that a woman’s hair is given to her for a covering. I believe that veiling was a cultural issue, just as it largely is in Middle Eastern culture today. Many supporters of a separate covering support their doctrine by stating that two separate Greek words are used to define the covering. The Greek word used in verses 5-7 is “katakalupto”, which means “to cover wholly, i.e. to veil”. The Greek word used in verse 15 is “peribolaion”, meaning “something thrown around one, i.e. a mantle or veil”. They also state that verses 5-7 are speaking of a temporary condition (praying or prophesying), so that it must mean a separate covering.

As I see it, the fact that two separate Greek words are translated as covering does not change the meaning. Either way, verse 15 says that a woman’s hair is her covering, or mantle, or veil. In verses 5-7, Paul is asking “is it comely for a woman to prey or prophesy uncovered”? If not, then she should have long hair in order to pray or prophesy. I don’t believe this necessarily relates to a temporary condition that requires a separate covering for prayer or prophesying.

In the early church it may have been a cultural necessity for the women to be veiled with a separate veil, but that doesn’t mean it is necessary in our culture. Similarly, the scriptures admonish us in four (4) separate places to “greet one another with a holy kiss”. We do not practice that as it is not our cultural custom, and even though it is sanctified as holy by the scriptures, it could be construed as perverted within our culture.

Brother Branham’s Teaching: During his ministry, Brother William Marrion Branham spoke out against women with short hair hundreds if not thousands of times. He stressed the meaning and importance of 1 Corinthians 11 as it deals with God’s order for men and women, and how that relates to our order under Christ. He used terms such as “short hair”, “bobbed hair”, “cut off hair”, and “cut hair”. When he used the term “cut hair” was he referring to the legality of cutting or trimming even a fraction of an inch, or was he referring to a worldly, perverted and “unladylike” look resulting from cutting noticeable length from the hair?

Brother Branham allowed his daughters to trim their hair, but it was not short like men’s hair. This is evident from the pictures in the “Messenger” / “Believers International” photo album, as well as admitted in his sermon on questions and answers as quoted below. As much as he preached against men without a backbone who allowed women to cut their hair, it seems unlikely that he would allow this within his own family if he truly believed “no trimming – period”. He stated that he “wished they (his daughters) didn’t even put a scissors in their hair”, but also stated that he didn’t think that would be wrong. When referring to older women with bangs, he said he thought they would be trying to look like “some little kid”, but he didn’t say it was wrong.

One could make the argument that it is okay for young girls, but not for married women to cut or trim their hair. I don’t believe this is supported scripturally. The scripture states that a virgin cares for the things of God and how she can please God, while a married woman cares for her husband and how she can please her husband. A married woman is under the headship of her husband, while an unmarried woman is under the headship of her earthly father. All are under the headship of Christ. The unmarried woman being uncovered would dishonor her earthly father the same as a married woman being uncovered would dishonor her husband.

Throughout William Branham's ministry, we have been unable to find him dealing with this subject, except in “Questions and Answers”, 64-0830M. The applicable section is included in its entirety below for proper context.


Q-343. When they cut it in... Is long--is long hair when they cut it in front? (Huh. Now, wait a minute; let me get this here. I...) Is long hair when they...
Well, I--I--maybe they mean this: "Is it long hair any longer when they cut it in front?" Not any longer; they've cut it off. See? But like the man that had the trousers cut them off three times and still too short. What say? What say? [Brother Branham has conversation with someone in audience--Ed.] Oh, that's what they're talking about. As I tease my little girl, she said... The "booms" I call them, you know, bangs, or whatever it is, you know, across the front here.
Well, I imagine those kids that's cutting their hair in front... You--maybe your mother could tell you about that (See?), if she wants you to do that way. I think it'd look kinda--kinda a little bit like a woman was looking through the rear view if she passed about twenty-five years old and wanted to cut them off in front like that, look like some little kid. Look on out here where you're going, sis, not where you've been. See?
And now, but cutting the hair, I--I--I'll tell you this. I can't--I--I ain't got no--no Scripture to say that you can cut so much of it and can't do the other. I--I haven't got no Scripture for that; I--I couldn't tell you that, sister, or brother, ever who it is.
I say one thing. I wished... Now, I know my kids has done that too, Rebekah and Sarah, I seen when they cut their hair off here in front, and plait it back here in the back, and make these things across the front, like this. I--I don't, I--I... Now, not holding them. See? No, sir. To me, I wished they didn't even put a scissors on their hair at all. But when they got all long, hanging down like this, and just cut the front of it out of their eyes, little kids maybe. I--I wouldn't know whether that'd be wrong; I wouldn't think so. See? But when you get... If you can, I--for you sisters, I'd just let it the way the Lord made it. See?
And of course, I know women wants to look pretty; that's nature; and that--that's what they should be. See? They should be that way. And so, that's fine, but just don't--don't; otherwise like this, don't look like the world (See?); don't pattern after the world. Things wrong... You want it cut off, like that, but don't cut your hair now. If you got the braids hanging down, or--or whatever it is in your hair, you leave it long. Don't cut it like it's going to look like the world. If you're just them little girls...[4]

William Branham stated that he has no scripture to say “you can cut so much of it and not the other”. We agree with him on that. The scripture doesn’t say, just as it doesn’t give details to define modesty. It is based on appearance – a woman should look distinctly different from a man by her hair. Her long hair is her glory, and it is given to her as a covering.

What does “Long” mean as used in 1 Corinthians 11?:

After going through all of the preceding discussions, the entire question regarding the “no trimming” doctrine hinges upon the meaning of the word “long”. The “covering” discussed in 1 Corinthians 11 is the “hair”. If a man or woman has “long hair”, he or she is said to be “covered”. If a man or woman does not have “long hair”, he or she is said to be “uncovered”. The Greek word for “long” used in this chapter is “komao”, which is translated as “to let the hair grow, have long hair”. It would seem that “long” is a subjective term, just as “modesty” is a subjective term. God wants his people to dress in a manner that doesn’t excite the flesh of the opposite sex. God also wants men to be distinctly men and masculine, and women to be distinctly women and feminine. He is saying that nature itself teaches that the difference should be shown by the way the hair is worn. When men or women cross that line, it is a perversion.

If the word “long” implies “uncut” hair for women, then it must have a completely different definition for men. No one would say that a man with hair to his waist and trimmed ends has short hair. “Nature itself” teaches us that this is wrong, according to Paul. However, if we take this meaning, a woman with hair to her waist and trimmed ends does by definition have short hair. These differing meanings are difficult to reconcile logically.

True revelation from God will fulfill the scripture, not change it. We should not shy away from nor attempt to re-define words from scripture, teachings from the early church or reformers, or other pertinent information, but should confront these facts straight forwardly with respect to scriptural doctrine. We should never try to mold facts to fit a doctrine, but should mold our doctrine to fit God’s word.

Commentary by Bible Scholars

The events that lie behind 1 Cor 11:3–16 seem to proceed as follows. Because of their new found freedom in Christ, women in the Corinthian church were praying and prophesying (1 Cor 11:5). From Pentecost on women had participated in prayer and prophecy (Acts 2:18), and it readily fit Paul’s own emphasis on freedom. But these women were not merely speaking in worship but doing it in a way that unnecessarily flaunted social convention and the order of creation. So Paul has to encourage them to exercise restraint. As in 1 Corinthians chapters 8–10, knowledge must be tempered with love.

“With his head covered” in verse 4 reads literally in the Greek, “having down from the head.” This might refer to long hair rather than to some external covering like a veil or shawl. In 1 Cor 11:14–15, Paul is definitely talking about relative lengths of hair for men and women, so it is somewhat more natural to assume that he has been talking about hairstyles all along. Long hair on Greek men might well have led to suspicions of homosexual behavior. If an external covering is meant, then Paul is probably objecting to a practice which resembled that of Roman priests pulling their togas up over their heads while offering sacrifice or performing religious rituals.

Wives, however, should keep their heads covered (1 Cor 11:5). Again, the covering could refer to long hair. It could be that Paul wants them to keep it “done up,” as was the custom among married women, rather than loose and flowing — a sign in some circles of being unmarried or, worse still, of suspected adultery (among Jews) or pagan, prophetic frenzy (among Greeks). Or it could be that they are simply wearing their hair too short, perilously close to the shaven heads of a convicted adulteress in Jewish circles or of the more “masculine” partner in a lesbian relationship in the Greek world.

Alternately, if an external head covering is meant, Paul probably wants married women to wear a shawl over their hair and shoulders, as many Greek women still did in public, and not to resemble those who discarded their hair coverings during pagan worship in order to demonstrate their temporary transcendence of human sexuality.

Paul also remarks ironically that if women are going to send ambiguous signals about their sexuality or religious commitments through inappropriate hairstyles or lack of headdress, then they might as well go all the way and become bald (or discard all head coverings) and unequivocally send the wrong signals. 1 Cor 11:7–10, however, state Paul’s true preference — that the Corinthian husbands and their wives revert back to the culturally appropriate signs of marital fidelity and worship of the one true God.

1 Cor 11:15 supports the idea that hair length or style has been the issue throughout 1 Cor 11:2–16. “As a covering” might more literally be rendered from the Greek as “instead of a wrap-around garment.” That is, rather than wearing the customary hair shawl as Greek women did, long hair, perhaps done up in a bun, will suffice for Christian women.

On the other hand, if an external garment is in view in 1 Cor 11:3–10, then Paul will be drawing an analogy here. Just as “nature” teaches that women should wear long hair as a head covering, so it is appropriate for women to further cover their heads according to the established custom of the day. But the transition is abrupt, and it would seem slightly better to see hair as the primary topic of this entire section. Grammatically, the least probable portions of this alternate rendering are the phrases, “let her be for now with short hair” and “she should grow it again” in verse 6. But the translation problems are solved if we adopt the interpretation that women were not keeping their hair “done up” properly. Then this verse would convey the sense, “If a woman will not do her hair properly, she might as well cut it off. But if it is disgraceful for a woman to be shorn or shaven as men are, she should do her hair in a womanly fashion.” Verse 15 might then be translated, “For long hair is given her so that she may wind it around her head.”

This interpretation is further benefited from that fact that the Greek words that are translated into English as "long hair" are "κομάω" or "κόμη" (komao or kome). The Greek word for hair is θρίξ (thrix) and is used 15 times to denote the hair of the head or the hair of animals. However, komao only appears in 1 Corinthians 11 and is used to designate the hair as an ornament (with the notion of length being only secondary and suggested) and hence differs from the word for physical hair.

The opening phrase in 1 Cor 11:16, “If anyone wants to be contentious about this,” is one of four such occurrences in 1 Corinthians, each indicating that this is what some are doing.

Paul’s final appeal to these women is that “we have no such practice — nor do the churches of God.”

The words “such practice,” therefore, must refer to that which the “contentious” are advocating, and which this argument has been combating.

Even though Paul has now spent considerable effort on this issue, the very nature of his argument reveals that it is not something over which he has great passion. Indeed, there is nothing quite like this in his other letters, where he argues for maintaining a custom, let alone predicating a large part of the argument on shame, propriety, and custom. Two observations, therefore, need to be made.

The very fact that Paul argues in this way, and that even at the end he does not give a commandment, suggests that such a “church custom,” although not thereby unimportant for the Corinthians, is not to be raised to the position of a legal requirement. The very “customary” nature of the problem, which could be argued in this way in the common uniform cultural environment of the Roman empire, makes it nearly impossible to transfer “across the board” to the multifaceted cultures in which the church finds itself today—even if we knew exactly what it was we were to transfer, which we do not. But in each culture there are surely those modes of dress that are appropriate and those that are not.

Finally, the more casual way Paul argues against this present “deviation” in comparison with what follows, seems to indicate the greater significance—for him at least—of the next one. Here he can appeal to shame, propriety, and custom; in the abuse that follows there is only attack and imperative. What they were doing with the Lord's Supper cut at the heart of both the gospel and the church; therefore, much is at stake. But here it is not quite so. The distinction between the sexes is to be maintained; the covering is to go back on; but for Paul it does not seem to be a life-and-death matter.[5]

Quotes of William Branham

He said, "Now, if they would cut it, if there's something wrong they had to cut their hair," said, "let them take a razor and shave it all off and make her hair real slick until it come out their head." That's right. That's what the Scripture said. It says if she cuts her hair, she dishonors her husband. And a woman that's dishonorable has a legal right to be put away in divorce. But he can't marry again now. But he--but he can put her away in divorcement. That's right. That's Scripture. Oh, brother, what we need is some question nights. That's right. That's I Corinthians the 14th chapter, if you want to read it. All right. Now, that--that... Now, this woman...[6]

Therefore He said, "Let the man cut his hair because of Christ. And let the woman have her hair, for if she cuts her hair she dishonors her husband." See? See what I mean or what the Scripture says?

I had a hot one on that down the other day in Shreveport. They was talking about the women, and should women wear long hair. And I said, "A woman that bobbed her hair, her husband had a right and a Bible right to divorce her." That's right. That's what the Bible said. That's exactly right. Oh, my. Holy Ghost women setting there, just the way they been taught; that's all... See? Yes, that's...?... loosely. And if...

He said, "Now, if they would cut it, if there's something wrong they had to cut their hair," said, "let them take a razor and shave it all off and make her hair real slick until it come out their head." That's right. That's what the Scripture said. It says if she cuts her hair, she dishonors her husband. And a woman that's dishonorable has a legal right to be put away in divorce. But he can't marry again now. But he--but he can put her away in divorcement. That's right. That's Scripture. Oh, brother, what we need is some question nights. That's right. That's I Corinthians the 14th chapter, if you want to read it. All right. Now, that--that... Now, this woman...[7]

The Bible said a woman's covering is her hair. And if she cuts her hair, it's a common thing for her to pray. That right? That's Scripture. See? So now, women are supposed to wear long hair, regardless of what you want to think about it; that's what's THUS SAITH THE LORD. If you can show me any place...

You say, "Well, my hair's long. See, it's down to my shoulders." That was short hair, "Christ..." You said, "had... Christ had long hair." No, He never. Christ had shoulder length hair, so they say. Just... They just pull it around this way and cut it off, shoulder length hair. Look at the Greek word on that in there, and you'll find out.[8]

Looky here. It used to be, a long time ago... And you holiness people, it was wrong for you women to cut your hair. What became right about it, when the Bible said that a, "If any woman cuts her hair, her husband has a right to give her a divorce." Plain teaching, but that's the Bible. And you women, get out here and cut your yards with overalls on and with man's garments. And the Bible said... Almighty God said, "A woman that'll put on a garment that pertains to a man, it's an abomination and filthy in the sight of God." And you do it.[9]

But let me tell you something. A lot of you women tonight would have an awful time doing that; you'd have to stand on your head to do it. Shame on you. The Bible said, "The hair is given to a woman for her glory." And the Bible rights gives any man a right to leave and divorce and leave his wife, that'll cut her hair. That's the Bible. That's THUS SAITH THE LORD. Too bad you got away from the old fashion trainings, isn't it?[10]

These women come up there with bobbed hair and painted faces (Pentecostals) and go in, and come out, and say they spoke in tongues; and never let their hair grow and still do the same thing they did. You tell me that's conversion?

That's a mockery of God. The Bible said it's a sin and a disgrace for them to cut their hair. How can a woman with bobbed hair condemn a woman's got paint on her face?[11]

Show me one place, if it isn't a curse for a woman to cut her hair. There you are. Then you fuss at me. Then people say, "Brother Branham's a prophet. Oh, you can believe him as long as he's talking to the people, telling their sins and things like that; but when he goes to teaching, don't you believe that." Well, you poor hypocrite. You don't know nothing. Doesn't the Bible say the Word of the Lord came to the prophets? I don't call myself a prophet; I'm no prophet. But you said so; I'm saying what you said. And then turn around and say a thing like that. Don't say you didn't do it. I've even got it taped where you said it. You didn't know that, did you? Just want you to say you didn't one time; that's all I want you to say. I'll let your own voice play back to you.[12]

You women that claim you've got the baptism of the Holy Ghost, and not the audacity to let your hear grow out; when the Bible condemns it and said a woman's... a man has got a right to put away his wife in divorce if she bobs her hair. Honored before God, to do so. The Bible said, if she cuts her hair, she dishonors her head. And it's a common; just, you know, what any old common thing is, for a woman to even pray with bobbed hair. See?

Wearing shorts, and these slacks, and things! The Bible said, "Any woman that will," (oh, you say...) "that put on a garment that pertains to a man, it's an abomination to God," filthy, dirty, like an old stinking bathroom somewhere. See? Oh, my! The filth in God's nostrils! And then you try to pray or offer up prayers in such a thing as that? God refuses it, turns it away. That's right.[13]

Also, Brother Branham, I believe a woman should be subject to her husband. But if a Christian woman has a sinner husband who does not even to one of your services--come to one of your services and won't--and wants his wife to be doing things, cutting her hair, wearing shorts, and going to ungodly places, is this woman supposed to be subject to this man in this way? Please explain this more clearly, as this is a question that is asked often.

No, sister, you are not subject to such a person. No indeedy. For this cause you'll leave everything and cleave to God. Now, the thing... If you want--that man wants to live with you, and you be--stay a Christian... But if he's going to make you wear shorts, cut your hair, and do all these other things, and ungodly places, you seek first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness. You're not bound to such a person as that. "But as long," the Bible says, "as she is pleased and he is pleased to dwell together (You remember that?), let them..."[14]

When they cut it in... Is long--is long hair when they cut it in front? (Huh. Now, wait a minute; let me get this here. I...) Is long hair when they...

Well, I--I--maybe they mean this: "Is it long hair any longer when they cut it in front?" Not any longer; they've cut it off. See? But like the man that had the trousers cut them off three times and still too short. What say? What say? [Brother Branham has conversation with someone in audience--Ed.] Oh, that's what they're talking about. As I tease my little girl, she said... The "booms" I call them, you know, bangs, or whatever it is, you know, across the front here.

Well, I imagine those kids that's cutting their hair in front... You--maybe your mother could tell you about that (See?), if she wants you to do that way. I think it'd look kinda--kinda a little bit like a woman was looking through the rear view if she passed about twenty-five years old and wanted to cut them off in front like that, look like some little kid. Look on out here where you're going, sis, not where you've been. See?

And now, but cutting the hair, I--I--I'll tell you this. I can't--I--I ain't got no--no Scripture to say that you can cut so much of it and can't do the other. I--I haven't got no Scripture for that; I--I couldn't tell you that, sister, or brother, ever who it is. I say one thing. I wished... Now, I know my kids has done that too, Rebekah and Sarah, I seen when they cut their hair off here in front, and plait it back here in the back, and make these things across the front, like this. I--I don't, I--I... Now, not holding them. See? No, sir. To me, I wished they didn't even put a scissors on their hair at all. But when they got all long, hanging down like this, and just cut the front of it out of their eyes, little kids maybe. I--I wouldn't know whether that'd be wrong; I wouldn't think so. See? But when you get... If you can, I--for you sisters, I'd just let it the way the Lord made it. See?

And of course, I know women wants to look pretty; that's nature; and that--that's what they should be. See? They should be that way. And so, that's fine, but just don't--don't; otherwise like this, don't look like the world (See?); don't pattern after the world. Things wrong... You want it cut off, like that, but don't cut your hair now. If you got the braids hanging down, or--or whatever it is in your hair, you leave it long. Don't cut it like it's going to look like the world. If you're just them little girls...[15]

Now this is going to be a--a little bitter maybe to somebody. But when she started through God's Filter, and It says in there for them not to cut their hair, then (what?) she lodges on the other side. If It said it's a sin for a woman to do such, and she's dishonorable to do such.

"If she wants to," he says, "well, she's got to have her hair cut." Said, then, "Shave it off then." And said, "We know that that's a shame for a woman to have a head shorn." Said, "Then let her have her head covered." And her hair is her covering; not a hat, lady. Her hair is her covering, the Bible said. Right. Shows she's a Nazarite unto the Lord. Long hair, to a woman, means a Nazarite to the Lord. Now, we find that that's true.[16]

Seeing, Lord, that the mental condition, the nervous age that the people's living in, it's driving them out of their mind; to exactly fulfill what the Scripture said and promised, the great hideous things would come upon the earth; like locusts, to haunt the women that cut their hair, they'll have long hair like a woman. And different hideous sights that they'll be able to see, Lord, in that mental, diluted conditions they're in, and then screaming for the rocks and the mountains. Women who would mother dogs and cats, and not raise children to honor You. Those that You did give children to and they did conceive them, turn them loose on the streets to do as they want. No wonder You said, Lord, when You were going to the cross, "Then they'll begin to cry for the rocks and the mountains to fall on them."[17]

References

Blomberg, C. 1994. 1 Corinthians. The NIV Application Commentary (208). Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI

Fee, G. D. 1987. The First Epistle to the Corinthians. The New International Commentary on the New Testament (530). Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.: Grand Rapids, MI


Footnotes

  1. The New International Version, (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2011), 1 Co 11:4-5
  2. Gordon D. Fee, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, The New International Commentary on the New Testament, (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1987), 495.
  3. Gordon D. Fee, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, The New International Commentary on the New Testament, (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1987), 506–507.
  4. QUESTIONS.AND.ANSWERS_ JEFF.IN COD SUNDAY_ 64-0830M
  5. The First Epistle to the Corinthians (New International Commentary on the New Testament) by Gordon D. Fee
  6. :QUESTIONS.AND.ANSWERS.ON.GENESIS_ JEFF.IN COD WEDNESDAY_ 53-0729
  7. QUESTIONS.AND.ANSWERS.ON.GENESIS_ JEFF.IN COD WEDNESDAY_ 53-0729
  8. QUESTIONS.AND.ANSWERS.2_ JEFF.IN COD SUNDAY_ 54-0103E
  9. THE.SEAL.OF.GOD_ JEFF.IN V-26 N-4 FRIDAY_ 54-0514
  10. THE.WORST.SINNER.IN.THE.CITY_ MINNEAPOLIS.MN SATURDAY_ 56-0218E
  11. A.TRUE.SIGN.THAT'S.OVERLOOKED JEFF.IN 61-1112
  12. THE.SPOKEN.WORD.IS.THE.ORIGINAL.SEED JEFF.IN 62-0318
  13. CHRIST.IS.THE.MYSTERY.OF.GOD.REVEALED JEFF.IN 63-0728
  14. QUESTIONS.AND.ANSWERS.2_ JEFF.IN COD SUNDAY_ 64-0823E
  15. QUESTIONS.AND.ANSWERS.3_ JEFF.IN 64-0830M
  16. A.THINKING.MAN'S.FILTER_ JEFF.IN 65-0822E
  17. GOD'S.ONLY.PROVIDED.PLACE.OF.WORSHIP_ SHP.LA 65-1128M


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